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  • Time Division

    November 30th, 2011
    time  [html]
    Julia and I try and divide things equally. We want to have about the same amount of time left over after work, school, homework, commuting, and housework. To see whether we need to make adjustments, we'll document how we spend our working hours for a couple weeks. We just finished our second time through this. [1] I found that I spend my time, in average hours per day measured 2011-10-07 to 2011-11-03 as:

    • work: 5.74
    • commute: 0.57
    • dishes: 0.34
    • class: 0.26
    • cooking: 0.10
    • groceries: 0.10
    • other housework: 0.07
    • total: 7.17

    Julia's total was seven minutes per day more than mine. My working hours come out little less than eight on the average workday, so I've been trying to fix this and make up the difference by working a bit longer.


    [1] The first one was about a year and a half ago. If was only somewhat helpful, mostly because we ran it too short (only a week) and because we both started doing more housework, competing a bit because we didn't want to be the one doing less. By running this for four weeks and actively trying to do the amount of work we would normally do, I think we got more representative results this time.

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