• Posts
  • RSS
  • ◂◂RSS
  • Contact

  • Thinking about going back to earning to give

    July 19th, 2017
    giving  [html]
    I'm wrapping up my AI risk project and at this point I'm thinking like I should probably go back to earning to give:
    • Most of my best altruistic options probably look a lot like what I did the past month, working remotely with varying amounts of self-management. While I suspected I wouldn't like this very much, now I know.

    • While I haven't finished the AI risk project yet, I think I'm pretty likely to conclude something like "I think work here is valuable, but not the very most pressing thing" and I don't think I'm a good fit for this kind of research.

    • I really like programming. When I think about different things I might work on, I keep coming back to opportunities that looked pretty exciting at big tech companies with openings here.

    • I still mostly agree with my 2016 EAG talk.

    My main reservation about earning to give continues to be that I think the most important things are mostly constrained by people, not money. But I'm not well suited to be one of those people, I am well suited to earning money, and money is still useful.

    (For more background and my constraints, see this earlier post.)

    Update 2017-08-17: I'm going back to Google.

    Comment via: google plus, facebook

    Recent posts on blogs I like:

    The Limit of Circles in the Suburbs

    In dense urban cores, it’s valuable to run circular rail lines. They connect dense near-center neighborhoods to one another without going through the more congested center, and help make transferring between parallel lines more efficient, again through av…

    via Pedestrian Observations September 6, 2020

    Collections: Bread, How Did They Make It? Addendum: Rice!

    As an addendum on to our four-part look at the general structures of the farming of cereal grains (I, II, III, IV) this post is going to briefly discuss some of the key ways that the structures of rice farming differ from the structures of wheat and barle…

    via A Collection of Unmitigated Pedantry September 4, 2020

    Notes on “Anthropology of Childhood” by David Lancy

    I read David Lancy’s “The Anthropology of Childhood: Cherubs, Chattel, and Changelings” and highlighted some passages. A lot of passages, it turns out. [content note: discussion of abortion and infanticide, including infanticide of children with disabilit…

    via The whole sky August 27, 2020

    more     (via openring)


  • Posts
  • RSS
  • ◂◂RSS
  • Contact