• Posts
  • RSS
  • ◂◂RSS
  • Contact

  • Rejoining Google

    August 17th, 2017
    work, giving, switching_jobs  [html]
    A week from Monday I'm starting back at Google. [1] I'm pretty excited about it, both the company and the team I'll be on.

    When I left Google for Wave I wrote:

    This does mean taking a pay cut: I'll be making about half as much [from a cashflow perspective]. At the same time, I'm moving from a job that was primarily valuable for what it would let me donate, to one that is primarily valuable for the work I'm doing. So I'm making two changes to my donation plans:
    • I'm planning to donate 30% instead of 50%. This is also 30% of a smaller number, so my total donations will look more like $50k than $150k.

    • I had been splitting my donations evenly between things that do good directly and things that try to grow the effective altruism movement. Working for Wave is in the former category, so I'm planning to focus donations on EA movement growth.

    Going back to Google means reversing both of these. I'm not sure if we can manage 50% in 2017 since I'm starting halfway through the year, but unless something large goes wrong I think we can.


    [1] Some background:

    Comment via: google plus, facebook

    Recent posts on blogs I like:

    The Politics of Taking Out the Garbage

    There’s a quote bouncing around urbanist media, attributed to Fiorello LaGuardia, that there is no Republican or Democratic way of taking out the garbage; see for examples CityLab and Governing. The idea of this quote is, there is no ideology in urban gov…

    via Pedestrian Observations June 1, 2020

    A simple way to get more value from tracing

    A lot of people seem to think that distributed tracing isn't useful, or at least not without extreme effort that isn't worth it for companies smaller than FB. For example, here are a couple of public conversations that sound like a number of priva…

    via Posts on Dan Luu May 31, 2020

    Embrace mediocre tastes, true happiness

    The plain fact is that there are no obvious moral consequences to how people entertain themselves in their leisure time. The conviction that artists and connoisseurs are morally advanced is a cognitive illusion, arising from the fact that our circuitry fo…

    via Holly Elmore May 24, 2020

    more     (via openring)

    More Posts


  • Posts
  • RSS
  • ◂◂RSS
  • Contact