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  • Making things mobile friendly II

    November 30th, 2016
    tech  [html]
    When I got a phone and started caring about how things looked on mobile I only fixed some of the pages on my site: home page, blog post template, etc. I have various pages scattered around, however, that I never got around to fixing. Most of why I had been putting this off is that it seemed like a lot of finicky work, like updating the EA forum display was. Except all of these pages are just simple html with no css:

    <td> 18462
    <tr> 3244
    <li> 414
    <p> 87
    <br> 70
    <ul> 61
    <i> 51
    <head> 31
    <html> 31
    <th> 31
    <hr> 30
    <title> 29
    <small> 27
    <body> 24
    <blockquote> 13
    <b> 8
    <ol> 8
    <table> 7
    <sup> 6
    <strike> 5
    <code> 3
    <style> 3
    <big> 2
    <center> 2
    <tt> 2
    <em> 1
    <pre> 1
    <script> 1

    (Why so many table cells? This list includes my schedule and history which consist of huge tables. Only 5% of the table cells come from the rest of the pages.)

    These pages are basically already responsive, and all they needed was:

    <meta name="viewport"
          content="width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0">
    
    to tell mobile browsers not to try to display them like a desktop site.

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