• Posts
  • RSS
  • ◂◂RSS
  • Contact

  • Narrow band television

    October 15th, 2009
    tech  [html]
    About a week ago I thought: a computer sound card can do digital to analogue conversion very well. A computer generally doesn't have an analogue video out port. Could one use the sound card for this? It turns out that this is possible to some extent, but not what I was hoping. The main problem is that standard television signals are high bandwidth, which means that we need a much higher sampling rate than a sound card does. A sound card gives you 44.1 thousand samples per second, but to do full tv at the standard 30 frames a second we need about 150 times that many samples. So anything that works is going to need to be a lot lower quality.

    There are two options for trading off quality: you can show smaller frames or fewer frames. It looks like people have done both. These are both technically "Narrow Band Television", but generally the former gets this name and the latter is called "Slow Scan Television". Narrow band is how television started, with very small pictures at full speed. SSTV is more recent, being used by ham radio operators to send primarily still pictures. Both of these are within reach of a sound card and can be done.

    For hooking a computer up to a modern but analogue television, SSTV would definitely not work for several reasons. The biggest is that the phosphor on the tv needs to be refreshed very often, and at several seconds a frame the top half of the screen would be long dark by the time the bottom half was drawn. It also seems that while the NTSC format does say the TV needs to sync up to the video input signal, that's mostly for fine correction. Sending the sync signals at a speed 1/150th or so of what was expected by the TV designers is unlikely to work.

    Narrow band TV is also not likely to work, but has a greater chance of working. If we can send the syncs proprly, we ought to be able to get it to jump back to the top of the screen after only sending 15 lines or so. This would let us draw a small image, though it would be way stretched. The problem, I think, is that we would need to send the sync signals with greater resolution than we can manage with a sound card.

    Update: 2009-11-26. Blake writes to give a link to using a vga card to generate DVB-T signals. Unlike an audio signal, a vga signal does have high enough bandwidth to display proper images. You need a card that can do 4096x2048 at exactly 76.5 MHz. Hmm.

    Comment via: facebook

    Recent posts on blogs I like:

    Who Should Bear the Risk in Infrastructure Projects?

    The answer to the question is the public sector, always. It’s okay to have private-sector involvement in construction, but the risk must be borne by the public sector, or else the private sector will just want more money to compensate for the extra risk. …

    via Pedestrian Observations November 30, 2020

    Fireside Friday, November 27, 2020

    Hey folks! Fireside this week. A bit of a change-up in terms of the coming attractions. I had planned to start “Textiles, How Did They Make It?” next, but I want to do a bit more reading on some of the initial stages of textile production (that is, the pr…

    via A Collection of Unmitigated Pedantry November 27, 2020

    Thoughts you mightn't have thunk about remote meetings

    Welcome to this week's edition of "building a startup in 2020," in which all your meetings are suddenly remote, and you probably weren't prepared for it. I know I wasn't. We started a "fully remote" company back in 2019, but …

    via apenwarr November 23, 2020

    more     (via openring)


  • Posts
  • RSS
  • ◂◂RSS
  • Contact