• Posts
  • RSS
  • ◂◂RSS
  • Contact

  • Make Your Giving Public

    September 21st, 2012
    publicy, giving  [html]
    People who donate substantial amounts of their income to charity are rare. Why is such an unusual thing to do? I think a lot is that is just seems weird, no? Who do you know that does that?

    Well, there's part of the problem: our cultural norm is to be quiet about giving and money. It makes sense: you can have all sorts of conflicts about money, and it would be unseemly for helping people to be turned into a game of one-upmanship. But on balance I think that norm is harmful: if more people were public about their giving it would appear less unusual. And if you do end up with people competing for status via giving, well at least their competition has highly beneficial side effects, as opposed to just yielding bigger cars and houses.

    So I encourage you to make your giving public, in the hope that it will inspire others. You don't have to broadcast it; putting it up somewhere other people can find it if they're looking is good too, but get it out there where people trying to get a sense of how much giving is socially normal can see it. As a step in this direction I've made a page listing my donations.

    (Inspired partly by Yvain's similar post.)

    Comment via: google plus, facebook, r/smartgiving

    Recent posts on blogs I like:

    Yet another world spirit sock puppet

    Crossposted from world spirit sock puppet. I have almost successfully made and made decent this here my new blog, in spite of little pre-existing familiarity with relevant tools beyond things like persistence in the face of adversity and Googling things. …

    via Meteuphoric October 25, 2020

    Things You Might Have Missed, October 21, 2020

    Hey folks! I am, as I mentioned last week, taking this week off in an effort to catch up on my sanity and also some grading and writing I need to be doing. But I didn’t want to leave you with nothing, so I thought I might use this as an opportunity to dir…

    via A Collection of Unmitigated Pedantry October 23, 2020

    Job Sprawl as Deurbanization

    A few years ago, Aaron Renn was writing, I think about the General Electric headquarters’ move from suburban New York to Downtown Boston in 2016, that in the future, city center jobs would go to high-value industries like corporate HQs and professional se…

    via Pedestrian Observations October 23, 2020

    more     (via openring)


  • Posts
  • RSS
  • ◂◂RSS
  • Contact