• Posts
  • RSS
  • ◂◂RSS
  • Contact

  • Wagon

    March 18th, 2019
    wagon  [html]
    In October I bought a wagon. It's 38x21", 800lb capacity, with removable sides. I've been able to move an enormous range of things with it. After it helped me get a huge barrel fan to BIDA yesterday, preparing for Beantown Stomp next weekend, I was thinking about how glad I am to have it. Here are some things I've used it for:
    • Your normal out-with-the-kids stuff:

    • My new rhythm stage setup, both kids:

    • 42" Barrel Fan, Lily:

    • Christmas tree, both kids:

    • Groceries, both kids. No picture.

    • Kids in blankets:

    • BIDA's stuff for hosting a dance at the Somerville Armory, both kids:

    The wagon is this one, with removable sides and an 800-lb capacity. It's definitely better than what we were doing before:

    • Groceries, Lily:

    • Christmas tree:

    • Groceries:

    The lightweight two-wheeled cart would be fine, except the handle is too short for me to find them comfortable and they kept breaking.

    While the wagon has replaced cargo uses of the stroller, the stroller is still useful if we're just moving the kids. It's more comfortable to push, we can take it on the bus, and it folds up to easily fit in a car trunk.

    (A car would be another way to handle most of these, but the distances involved are short, we'd have to deal with parking, some of the things are too big to fit in a car, and cars are expensive.)

    Comment via: facebook

    Recent posts on blogs I like:

    Collections: Clothing, How Did They Make It? Part I: High Fiber

    This week we are starting the first of a four (?) part look at pre-modern textile production. As with our series on farming and iron, we are going to follow the sequence of production from the growing of fibers all the way to the finished object, with a f…

    via A Collection of Unmitigated Pedantry March 5, 2021

    Austerity is Inefficient

    Working on an emergency timetable for regional rail has made it clear how an environment of austerity requires tradeoffs that reduce efficiency. I already talked about how the Swiss electronics before concrete slogan is not about not spending money but ab…

    via Pedestrian Observations February 27, 2021

    The Troubling Ethics of Writing (A Speech from Ancient Sumer)

    (Translated from a transcript of an ancient Sumerian speech by Uruk's most well-respected Scriptological Ethicist) Writing is a profoundly dangerous technology: Access to writing was initially, and still remains, uneven. What's worse, the rich are m…

    via BLOG - Cullen O'Keefe February 15, 2021

    more     (via openring)


  • Posts
  • RSS
  • ◂◂RSS
  • Contact