• Posts
  • RSS
  • ◂◂RSS
  • Contact

  • Restocking

    July 23rd, 2020
    food, preparedness  [html]
    The pandemic has illustrated the resiliency benefits of keeping extras on hand. During the grocery panic, when everyone was trying to stock up on weeks' worth of groceries at the same time, people who had extra set aside didn't need to go out to a potentially dangerous environment. Similarly, by avoiding shopping at this time when there was sudden massive demand, these people were able to help blunt the shock.

    It's far from over, but at least around here the supply chain seems to mostly have recovered. You still can't get N95 masks, but there's no trouble getting flour, rice, beans, toilet paper, etc. If you've let your supply run down over the last few months, or didn't have extra set aside to begin with, now would be a good time to think about fixing that. Not only could the pandemic get worse in a way that starts to threaten the supply chain again, but many more conventional disasters, like earthquakes or hurricanes, could be much worse with the pandemic as a background.

    As I wrote just before the pandemic, it's worth putting time into thinking about potential disasters and getting at least somewhat prepared for them. Lots of links in that post if you're looking for advice on how to approach this.

    Comment via: facebook, lesswrong

    Recent posts on blogs I like:

    Collections: Iron, How Did They Make It? Part I, Mining

    This week we are starting a four-part look at pre-modern iron and steel production. As with our series on farming, we are going to follow the train of iron production from the mine to a finished object, be that a tool, a piece of armor, a simple nail, a w…

    via A Collection of Unmitigated Pedantry September 18, 2020

    Learning Game

    I came up with this game. In the game one person thinks of something and then gives the other person a clue. And the other person writes a guess down on a blackboard or a piece of paper. Or really anything you have that's laying around that's av…

    via Lily Wise's Blog Posts September 17, 2020

    Hong Kong Construction Costs

    I think we have found the #2 city in urban rail construction costs, behind only New York. This is Hong Kong, setting a world record for the most expensive urban el and encroaching on Singapore for most expensive non-New York subway. As we look for more da…

    via Pedestrian Observations September 16, 2020

    more     (via openring)


  • Posts
  • RSS
  • ◂◂RSS
  • Contact