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  • Present Timing for Kids

    December 20th, 2018
    kids, presents  [html]
    We recently did an early family Christmas, before the rest of our relatives come to town. We usually go around in a circle, taking turns picking out a present to give to someone, with most of the presents going to the kids. Even though this was mostly for the kids' benefit, it didn't feel quite right. For example, Anna had asked for a blue calendar, and this was the first present she opened:

    She absolutely loved it, and would have been happy playing with it for a long time. But we needed to get through opening all the presents, so it wasn't long before we made her set it aside to open another.

    I do think they enjoyed this and I don't think they'd rather get fewer presents. What I'd like to try next year, however, is spread the kids' presents out over more time, one per day. That way each of the kids can get a present and play with it as long as they like, without having to move on before they're ready.

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