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  • Phone Update: 3 months In

    February 10th, 2012
    phone  [html]
    With three months of time to get used to it, what I like about my Galaxy S II:
    1. I can be sloppy about preparing for trips because the phone has maps and gps and can give me directions.
    2. Bus predictions (though they've gotten worse lately, not sure why).
    3. I can take pictures.
    4. People can text me.
    5. I can do email in a pinch
    6. I have something to read
    7. I can jot down notes and ideas
    What I don't like:
    1. The web browser freezes and has to be killed a lot.
    2. The camera freezes the device while it starts, which I just timed at 5 seconds, and if you leave it in the foreground when putting the phone to sleep you have to wait again when waking it up.
    3. CyanogenMod doesn't have Android 4 ready yet, so I can't install Chrome for Android or other new shiny things.
    4. Like most smartphones, there are two processors with limited interconnectivity. Which means you can't have an app that works like an answering machine.
    5. Sound latency is far too high for realtime interaction and musical performance.
    On which I am ambivalent:
    1. People now call me for directions or to look up when their next bus is coming.
    2. I can look up information that's at issue in a conversation.
    3. People can call me.

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