• Posts
  • RSS
  • ◂◂RSS
  • Contact

  • Breaking Group Rock Paper Scissors

    October 31st, 2019
    games  [html]
    Let's say you're at a conference and the leader gets everyone to play group Rock, Paper, Scissors as an icebreaker:

    • Play Rock, Paper, Scissors in pairs. Best 2 out of 3 wins.
    • Each time someone loses, they and anyone in their cheering squad become part of the winner's cheering squad.
    • Continue until there's a champion.

    How do you maximize your chances of winning?

    This is structured as a single-elimination tournament, except there's nothing to ensure that it's a proper binary tree. Because different games will take different amounts of time, and you're about 50-50 on winning each match, you want to play as few matches as possible while your opponents play as many as possible and eliminate each other. It's like a Slow Bicycle Race, where everyone has to keep making forward progress, but only just barely.

    (You can also try to win by predicting your opponent's choices, but that's very hard. Unless your opponent is a small child in which case an "always choose paper" strategy can work well.)

    Comment via: facebook, lesswrong

    Recent posts on blogs I like:

    More on the Deutschlandtakt

    The Deutschlandtakt plans are out now. They cover investment through 2040, but even beforehand, there’s a plan for something like a national integrated timetable by 2030, with trains connecting the major cities every 30 minutes rather than hourly. But the…

    via Pedestrian Observations July 1, 2020

    How do cars fare in crash tests they're not specifically optimized for?

    Any time you have a benchmark that gets taken seriously, some people will start gaming the benchmark. Some famous examples in computing are the CPU benchmark specfp and video game benchmarks. With specfp, Sun managed to increase its score on 179.art (a su…

    via Posts on Dan Luu June 30, 2020

    Quick note on the name of this blog

    When I was 21 a friend introduced me to a volume of poems by the 14th-century Persian poet Hafiz, translated by Daniel Ladinsky. I loved them, and eventually named this blog for one of my favorite ones. At some point I read more and found that Ladinsky’s …

    via The whole sky June 21, 2020

    more     (via openring)


  • Posts
  • RSS
  • ◂◂RSS
  • Contact