• Posts
  • RSS
  • ◂◂RSS
  • Contact

  • Breaking Group Rock Paper Scissors

    October 31st, 2019
    games  [html]
    Let's say you're at a conference and the leader gets everyone to play group Rock, Paper, Scissors as an icebreaker:

    • Play Rock, Paper, Scissors in pairs. Best 2 out of 3 wins.
    • Each time someone loses, they and anyone in their cheering squad become part of the winner's cheering squad.
    • Continue until there's a champion.

    How do you maximize your chances of winning?

    This is structured as a single-elimination tournament, except there's nothing to ensure that it's a proper binary tree. Because different games will take different amounts of time, and you're about 50-50 on winning each match, you want to play as few matches as possible while your opponents play as many as possible and eliminate each other. It's like a Slow Bicycle Race, where everyone has to keep making forward progress, but only just barely.

    (You can also try to win by predicting your opponent's choices, but that's very hard. Unless your opponent is a small child in which case an "always choose paper" strategy can work well.)

    Comment via: facebook, lesswrong

    Recent posts on blogs I like:

    The Limit of Circles in the Suburbs

    In dense urban cores, it’s valuable to run circular rail lines. They connect dense near-center neighborhoods to one another without going through the more congested center, and help make transferring between parallel lines more efficient, again through av…

    via Pedestrian Observations September 6, 2020

    Collections: Bread, How Did They Make It? Addendum: Rice!

    As an addendum on to our four-part look at the general structures of the farming of cereal grains (I, II, III, IV) this post is going to briefly discuss some of the key ways that the structures of rice farming differ from the structures of wheat and barle…

    via A Collection of Unmitigated Pedantry September 4, 2020

    Notes on “Anthropology of Childhood” by David Lancy

    I read David Lancy’s “The Anthropology of Childhood: Cherubs, Chattel, and Changelings” and highlighted some passages. A lot of passages, it turns out. [content note: discussion of abortion and infanticide, including infanticide of children with disabilit…

    via The whole sky August 27, 2020

    more     (via openring)


  • Posts
  • RSS
  • ◂◂RSS
  • Contact