::  Posts  ::  RSS  ::  ◂◂RSS  ::  Contact

What if we got that alert?

January 19th, 2018
preparedness  [html]

Saturday morning people in Hawaii got:

It turned out to be a false alarm, but it got me thinking about what I would do if I received this alarm now. Something like:

  1. Bring my kids down to the basement. Tell them we're going to need to stay there for a while.

  2. Get the kids settled, probably watching a video on a tablet. They don't get to do much of this (generally ~3min/day) so it would probably be enough to keep them distracted.

  3. Go back upstairs and grab blankets and pillows. Air mattresses too if there seems to be time. These aren't things it makes sense to keep in the basement because they might get moldy.

  4. Turn on the radio. We have a hand-crank one in the basement if the power's out.

  5. If it seems like there's time, close upstairs windows.

  6. Seal the openings to the basement (windows and doors) with plastic sheeting and duct tape.

  7. Wait, hope it's a false alarm.

  8. If it's not a false alarm, and we survive, take potassium iodide tablets.

  9. After a while, remove the window sealing and get the place ventilated.

  10. Stay in the basement for two weeks. Not fun.

Maybe I should read Nuclear War Survival Skills, or at least keep a copy in the basement. Things that are already in the basement that would be helpful are food, water, potassium iodide tablets, hand-crank radio, some other things.

Comment via: google plus, facebook

Recent posts on blogs I like:

How Fast New York Regional Rail Could Be Part 3

In the third and last installment of my series posting sample commuter rail schedules for New York (part 1, part 2), let’s look at trains in New Jersey. This is going to be a longer post, covering six different lines, namely all New Jersey Transit lines t…

via Pedestrian Observations October 21, 2019

Strong stances

I. The question of confidence Should one hold strong opinions? Some say yes. Some say that while it’s hard to tell, it tentatively seems pretty bad (probably). There are many pragmatically great upsides, and a couple of arguably unconscionable downsides. …

via Meteuphoric October 15, 2019

What do executives do, anyway?

An executive with 8,000 indirect reports and 2000 hours of work in a year can afford to spend, at most, 15 minutes per year per person in their reporting hierarchy... even if they work on nothing else. That job seems impossible. How can anyone make any im…

via apenwarr September 29, 2019

more     (via openring)

More Posts:


  ::  Posts  ::  RSS  ::  ◂◂RSS  ::  Contact