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  • Google Transit: Boston

    November 2nd, 2009
    transport, mbta  [html]
    Apparently, google maps has known the mbta schedules since july. I've just noticed this now. It's very good, much better than the mbta's plan my trip page. Things I like:
    • It's fully integrated into google maps, so I can click once and have it switch to walking (biking) directions
    • It's prettier
    • I have a vague impression that the routefinding is better, but it may not be.
    • It's fast and responsive
    • It's pleasant to use
    Things I don't like:
    • You can't drag the start and end trip markers unless you temporarily switch to walking/driving mode.
    • It won't give me a map of all bus routes in an area with notations to show how frequently they come. As we just moved to cambridge, this would be very helpful. I've mostly figured what roads have high frequency busses from the mbta site, but it took a while.
    • It is not ok with trips to places the mbta doesn't go. If I want to go to bedford, ok, take the 62 bus. If I want to go a little past bedford towards carslile, it will tell me how But if I want to go a little further, it refuses even though it's happy to offer walking directions. It's just a little more walking. Bother.
    • I can't drag around walking portions of the route; they're fixed.

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