::  Posts  ::  RSS  ::  ◂◂RSS  ::  Contact

Annealing

December 30th, 2012
change, time  [html]
Flexible and pliable in youth, rigid and set in age. When an organization is founded it usually has a purpose and little else. The founders have some ideas about how to run it, but try many things. Over time, if it succeeds, it settles and solidifies into a stable institution with an inertia that it keeps it consistent and resistant to change. Software systems run through this pattern faster, often going from design to prototype to production to legacy in only a few years. And of course people run through this pattern too as they age.

This process is often seen as negative, where people are exhorted to keep an open mind as they age and large organizations are mocked by agile pivoting startups, but that sells it short. There are far more possible ways to be than anyone can explore, and at the same time you'd rather spend more time in the better places. You need some way to decide whether to accept potential changes that balances the good of staying with the current system against the unknown better systems out there. Decreasing willingness to accept change over time is a good solution that works well over a wide range of problems.

Comment via: google plus, facebook

Recent posts on blogs I like:

The Private Sector’s Role in Transit Innovation

The United States has long had private success and public failure – not just the sense of private affluence and public squalor, in which household income is high but the state of public services lags, but also in that the private sector is more productive…

via Pedestrian Observations June 17, 2019

Unintended pregnancy in folk songs

I’ve been listening to a lot of the Watersons and Waterson:Carthy this week. It’s reminded me how absolutely full British folk music is of songs about unintended pregnancy. Most commonly the result is unhappy motherhood: “But if I had kent that I now ken …

via The whole sky June 1, 2019

Programmer migration patterns

I made a little flow chart of mainstream programming languages and how programmers seem to move from one to another. There's a more common kind of chart, which shows how the languages themselves evolved. I didn't want to show the point of view of …

via apenwarr March 18, 2019

more     (via openring)

More Posts:


  ::  Posts  ::  RSS  ::  ◂◂RSS  ::  Contact